Friday, 13 February 2009

Specialist or "well-rounded"?

Admittedly I had no idea what studying liberal arts really was, but after some research I find myself persuaded to study it. I can definitely see why students and parents would wonder how a general education could benefit over a specialized one. However, it seems proven effective in producing people who learn to think and look at the world from many perspectives, hence creativity. Yet you cannot deny the validity of specialized courses as long as they actually teach students to an employable standard.

In the context of the games industry, I'm not sure how liberal arts would play a big part, I mean maybe if you were employing a leader or manager of some sort...liberal arts just seems more intelligent. Kids are so ignorant and lacking self dependance these days. We're just kinda shoved through this education system, forced to pick a subject to study out of fear of working in a supermarket or factory for the rest of our lives, and plunged into the first of many debts that greedily await us.......too dramatic?

Specialized education is marketed to us as a more 'value for money' option that makes a beeline towards your desired career. Apparently this makes us less wholesome and knowledgeable and there are factors that will support this point of view. For one, the teacher to student ratio and interaction is more personal on a liberal arts course and it's like studying the more academic subjects that we artists avoid and showing us how to use them on a day-to-day beneficial basis.

Courses like Game Art teaches us specific skills that we will unquestionably need to even be considered for a job in the industry...so how can we combine the two styles of education? Critical studies like this is a start; studying the relevant industry and everything that has, is and may affect it. We don't need to know about absolutely everything for one career, that's why courses started specializing in the first place.
Basically, if you don't know what you're on about, it's gonna show but I don't think employers should judge others based entirely on educational background and I'm sure some don't. It always boils down to quality anyway.


http://economistsview.typepad.com/economistsview/2006/06/the_decline_of_.html